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Reports Publications



  Systemic Interventions to Support the Access of Rural Poor to Safe and Sustainable Housing
  Systemic Interventions to Support the Access of Rural Poor to Safe and Sustainable Housing – Awareness, Action and Advocacy for a Responsive Policy Environment

In 2014, basin-South Asia along with its partner submitted a paper in UN-Habitat International conference on ‘Restoring Communities through Home-Owner-Driven Reconstruction: from post-Emergency to Development’. The paper is a narrative account of the journey of the basin-South Asia platform in India to advocate for a national rural housing policy in order to facilitate ‘safe and sustainable habitat for All’ in rural India and the movement in the policy environment as a result.

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  National Round Table on Eco-habitat for All
  The National Round Table on Eco-habitat for All on September 11, 2012 is a national level confluence of five regional Yatras conducted under the aegis of the Lok Awaas Yatra.

The discussions are being organised by basin-South Asia, the Rural Housing Knowledge Network Project- Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi and Development Alternatives as a forum for policy makers and key stakeholder groups to derive lessons from the Yatras to help facilitate sustainable rural habitat development at scale.. In the concluding session of the round table, establishment of a National Rural Habitat Network was proposed to scale up eco habitat development in rural India. The proceedings of thw workshop are as follows:

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  Handbook on Eco-habitat for Village Panchayats
This handbook is the result of a manthan or assimilation of lessons that were generated during the two-year-long Lok Awaas Yatra initiative of basin-South Asia Regional Knowledge Platform. The partners of the basin-South Asia and local stakeholders from their field areas visited various housing and habitat initiatives across the country to learn about the diverse eco-habitat development practices. The case studies mentioned in this document are by no means the ultimate or the only experiences of eco-habitat. They are, nonetheless, an inspiration for an alternative development pathway and perhaps happier and more secure lives and livelihoods.

The handbook can guide local governance institutions across the country to actively plan and implement eco-habitat development in their villages. In this Handbook, eco-habitat is referred to as contextually relevant, environmentally and socially responsible housing and habitat development. It includes the concept of energy and resource efficient construction, non-polluting  and environment-friendly technologies, job creation and local wealth generating habitat practices, that result in safe and sustainable rural habitat.

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  A Handbook ‘Transparency and Right to Information in Panchayati Raj’
 
The core feature of a decentralized democracy is participation by the people in all aspects of local governance, their access to constitutional rights and delivery of duties. Access to relevant information when required is critical not only for minimizing the distance between the government and the people but also for realizing the ideals of good governance. The handbook on ‘TRANSPARENCY AND RIGHT TO INFORMATION IN PANCHAYATI RAJ’ published by the Swiss Agency for Development and Co-operation (SDC), intends to facilitate greater efficiency in Panchayati Raj Institutions, the village governance institutions in India.

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  Water and Sanitation Extension Program
  Water and Sanitation Extension Program (WASEP), an initiative by the Aga Khan Planning and Building Services (AKPBS), Pakistan in 1997 was designed to provide integrated water supply infrastructure services. It also aimed to prevent water related diseases through improved hygiene and sanitation practices in Northern Pakistan where approximately 80 to 85 percent of the population do not have access to potable water.


Under the program, AKPBS provided potable water to the villages from available sources like natural mountain springs or river channels and also installed infrastructures that distilled dirty water and collected excess water at tap-stands. Health and hygiene programme was integral to the initiative. The community was provided with necessary technical skills for toilet construction and trained on personal hygiene, toilet use, food preparation, storage and maintenance of waste sources.

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  Assessing Damage after Disasters - A Participatory Framework and Toolkit
Damage Assessment after any disaster, is crucial to respond to the needs of the affected communities. But for effective post disaster response, involvement of the affected stakeholders is needed.

Unnati has developed a manual “Assessing Damage after Disasters - A Participatory Framework and Toolkit” for multi sector damage assessment which can be used by NGOs, Local Governing Institutions and humanitarian workers engaged in planning and responding in post –disaster situations. The manual focuses on the methods and tools which are participatory in nature, takes care of the subjective dimensions intensive, iterative and can be customised as per the contextual needs. These tools and methodologies include Village Transect that involves collecting data informally by going around the village and talking to the affected community, Mapping using PRA techniques, Photographic Documentation, Village or Household Level Survey. The speciality of these tools and methodologies is that it is participatory in nature, takes care of the subjective dimensions, intensive, iterative and can be customised as per the contextual needs. To know more, download the document

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  Assessing Damage after Disasters - A Participatory Framework and Toolkit
The scale of urban expansion in India is and will continue to be enormous, driven by economic and population growth. The construction and use of buildings, driven by rapid urban expansion, is likely to impose tremendous pressures on the natural environment. Today’s infrastructure investments will play a critical role in determining future resource intensity and affect India’s ability to decouple resource consumption from economic growth. Urbanisation in India is less advanced than in many other countries, which presents an opportunity to avoid being locked into energy- and resource-intensive infrastructure. The promotion of green buildings, which has already begun in India, offers one way to achieve this.

The German Institute for International Development (GIZ) in India commissioned a study from the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) in collaboration with Development Alternatives in order to gain a better understanding of India’s construction sector and the incentives for private-sector investment in green buildings. The aim was to make policy recommendations to enhance the incentives for a stronger, private-sector-led ‘green’ construction sector in India. The study would also draw on lessons from other countries about policies that foster green buildings.

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